Quotes: colleges

Quotes 1 till 7 of 7.

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  • Ralph Waldo Emerson
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    American poet and philosopher 1803-1882
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
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    +5
    The colleges, while they provide us with libraries, furnish no professors of books; and I think no chair is so much needed.
  • Robert Green Ingersoll
    Robert Green Ingersoll
    American lawyer, a Civil War veteran and politician 1833-1899
    Robert Green Ingersoll
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     0
    Colleges are places where pebbles are polished and diamonds are dimmed.
  • Abraham Lincoln
    Abraham Lincoln
    American statesman 1809-1865
    Abraham Lincoln
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     0
    Let reverence for the laws be breathed by every American mother to the lisping babe that prattles on her lap. Let it be taught in schools, in seminaries, and in colleges. Let it be written in primers, spelling books, and in almanacs. Let it be preached from the pulpit, proclaimed in legislative halls, and enforced in the courts of justice. And, in short, let it become the political religion of the nation.
  • Walt Whitman
    Walt Whitman
    American poet, essayist, and journalist 1819-1892
    Walt Whitman
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     0
    The genius of the United States is not best or most in its executives or legislatures, nor in its ambassadors or authors or colleges, or churches, or parlors, nor even in its newspapers or inventors, but always most in the common people.
  • Alistair Cooke
    Alistair Cooke
    British journalist 1908-
    Alistair Cooke
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     0
    These doomsday warriors look no more like soldiers than the soldiers of the Second World War looked like conquistadors. The more expert they become the more they look like lab assistants in small colleges.
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    American poet and philosopher 1803-1882
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
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     0
    We are shut up in schools and college recitation rooms for ten or fifteen years, and come out at last with a belly-full of words and do not know a thing. The things taught in schools and colleges are not an education, but the means of education.
  • We conclude that, simultaneously with the organization of the colleges, there should be at Santa Cruz an organization by disciplines, whose units would have a voice in appointments and promotions, in course of programs, and in the allocation of funds for research.
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