Quotes: countenance

Quotes 1 till 14 of 14.

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  • Joseph Addison
    Joseph Addison
    English politician, writer and poet 1672-1719
    Joseph Addison
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    Good nature is more agreeable in conversation than wit and gives a certain air to the countenance which is more amiable than beauty.
  • John Ray
    John Ray
    English naturalist 1627-1705
    John Ray
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    There are no better cosmetics than a severe temperance and purity, modesty and humility, a gracious temper and calmness of spirit; and there is no true beauty without the signatures of these graces in the very countenance.
  • Les Brown
    Les Brown
    American motivational speaker, author and radio DJ 1945-
    Les Brown
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    Your smile will give you a positive countenance that will make people feel comfortable around you.
  • Benjamin Franklin
    Benjamin Franklin
    American statesman and physicist 1706-1790
    Benjamin Franklin
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    A benevolent man should allow a few faults in himself, to keep his friends in countenance.
  • Geoffrey Chaucer
    Geoffrey Chaucer
    British poet 1340-1400
    Geoffrey Chaucer
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    Certes, they been lye to hounds, for an hound when he cometh by the roses, or by other bushes, though he may nat pisse, yet wole he heve up his leg and make a countenance to pisse.
  • Charles Dickens
    Charles Dickens
    English writer 1812-1870
    Charles Dickens
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    I have known a vast quantity of nonsense talked about bad men not looking you in the face. Don't trust that conventional idea. Dishonesty will stare honesty out of countenance any day in the week, if there is anything to be got by it.
  • Sallust
    Sallust
    Roman historian 86-34 BC
    Sallust
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    It is the nature of ambition to make men liars and cheats, to hide the truth in their breasts, and show, like jugglers, another thing in their mouths, to cut all friendships and enmities to the measure of their own interest, and to make a good countenance without the help of good will.
  • Charles Dickens
    Charles Dickens
    English writer 1812-1870
    Charles Dickens
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    It opens the lungs, washes the countenance, exercises the eyes, and softens down the temper; so cry away.
  • Lord Chesterfield
    Lord Chesterfield
    English statesman, diplomat and writer (Philip Dormer Stanhope) 1694-1773
    Lord Chesterfield
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    Observe it, the vulgar often laugh, but never smile, whereas well-bred people often smile, and seldom or never laugh. A witty thing never excited laughter, it pleases only the mind and never distorts the countenance.
  • Jeremy Collier
    Jeremy Collier
    English theatre critic, non-juror bishop and theologian 1650-1726
    Jeremy Collier
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    Perpetual pushing and assurance put a difficulty out of countenance and make a seeming difficulty gives way.
  • Jonathan Swift
    Jonathan Swift
    English writer 1667-1745
    Jonathan Swift
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    The two maxims of any great man at court are, always to keep his countenance and never to keep his work.
  • Johann Kaspar Lavater
    Johann Kaspar Lavater
    Swiss theologist and mysticist 1741-1801
    Johann Kaspar Lavater
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    There are many kinds of smiles, each having a distinct character. Some announce goodness and sweetness, others betray sarcasm, bitterness and pride; some soften the countenance by their languishing tenderness, others brighten by their spiritual vivacity.
  • This man, although he appeared so humble and embarrassed in his air and manners, and passed so unheeded, had inspired me with such a feeling of horror by the unearthly paleness of his countenance, from which I could not avert my eyes, that I was unable longer to endure it.
  • G. C. Lichtenberg
    G. C. Lichtenberg
    German writer and physicist 1742-1799
    G. C. Lichtenberg
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    We can see nothing whatever of the soul unless it is visible in the expression of the countenance; one might call the faces at a large assembly of people a history of the human soul written in a kind of Chinese ideograms.
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