Quotes: from

Quotes 16 till 30 of 3918.

  • Henry David Thoreau
    Henry David Thoreau
    American writer 1817-1862
    Henry David Thoreau
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    I sat at a table where were rich food and wine in abundance, and obsequious attendance, but sincerity and truth were not; and I went away hungry from the inhospitable board.
  • George Orwell
    George Orwell
    English writer (ps. of Eric Blair) 1903-1950
    George Orwell
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    Part of the reason for the ugliness of adults, in a child's eyes, is that the child is usually looking upwards, and few faces are at their best when seen from below.
  • Joseph Addison
    Joseph Addison
    English politician, writer and poet 1672-1719
    Joseph Addison
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    Prejudice and self-sufficiency naturally proceed from inexperience of the world, and ignorance of mankind.
  • Joseph Addison
    Joseph Addison
    English politician, writer and poet 1672-1719
    Joseph Addison
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    True happiness arises, in the first place, from the enjoyment of one's self, and in the next, from the friendship and conversation of a few select companions.
  • Cato the Elder
    Cato the Elder
    Roman senator and historian 234-149 BC
    Cato the Elder
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    Wise men profit more from fools than fools from wise men; for the wise men shun the mistakes of fools, but fools do not imitate the successes of the wise.
  • Caroline Shaw
    Caroline Shaw
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    'Partita' is a simple piece. Born of a love of surface and structure, of the human voice, of dancing and tired ligaments, of music, and of our basic desire to draw a line from one point to another.
  • Samuel Johnson
    Samuel Johnson
    English writer 1709-1784
    Samuel Johnson
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    A am a great friend of public amusements, they keep people from vice.
  • Sholem Aleichem
    Sholem Aleichem
    leading Yiddish author and playwright. 1859-1916
    Sholem Aleichem
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    A bachelor is a man who comes to work each morning from a different direction.
  • Sri Swami Sivananda
    Sri Swami Sivananda
    Indian arts 1887-
    Sri Swami Sivananda
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    A desire arises in the mind. It is satisfied immediately another comes. In the interval which separates two desires a perfect calm reigns in the mind. It is at this moment freed from all thought, love or hate. Complete peace equally reigns between two mental waves.
  • Thomas Alva Edison
    Thomas Alva Edison
    American inventor and founder of General Electric 1847-1931
    Thomas Alva Edison
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    A famous person is often remembered for the ability to take from mankind rather than for his ability to give to mankind.
  • Chief Seattle
    Chief Seattle
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    A few more moons, a few more winters, and not one of all the mighty hosts that once filled this broad land or that now roam in fragmentary bands through these vast solitudes will remain to weep over the tombs of a people once as powerful and as hopeful as your own. But why should we repine? Why should I murmur at the fate of my people? Tribes are made up of individuals and are no better than they. Men come and go like the waves of the sea. A tear, a tamanamus, a dirge, and they are gone from our
    Source: Speech 1854
  • Pam Brown
    Pam Brown
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    A friendship can weather most things and thrive in thin soil; but it needs a little mulch of letters and phone calls and small, silly presents every so often - just to save it from drying out completely.
  • A great man is different from an eminent one in that he is ready to be the servant of the society.
  • Barbara de Angelis
    Barbara de Angelis
    American relationship consultant, lecturer and author 1951-
    Barbara de Angelis
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    A man's brain has a more difficult time shifting from thinking to feeling than a women's brain does.
  • Bertrand Russell
    Bertrand Russell
    English philosopher and mathematician 1872-1970
    Bertrand Russell
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    A truer image of the world, I think, is obtained by picturing things as entering into the stream of time from an eternal world outside, than from a view which regards time as the devouring tyrant of all that is.