Quotes: from

Quotes 46 till 60 of 3918.

  • Vauvenargues
    Vauvenargues
    French philosopher 1715-1747
    Vauvenargues
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    Great thoughts always come from the heart.
  • Bhagavad Gita
    Bhagavad Gita
    Hindu scripture in Sanskrit
    Bhagavad Gita
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    +1
    He is not elevated by good fortune or depressed by bad. His mind is established in God, and he is free from delusion.
  • Graham Greene
    Graham Greene
    English writer 1904-
    Graham Greene
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    His hilarity was like a scream from a crevasse.
  • Machiavelli
    Machiavelli
    Florentijns staatsphilosopher 1469-1527
    Machiavelli
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    I consider it a mark of great prudence in a man to abstain from threats or any contemptuous expressions, for neither of these weaken the enemy, but threats make him more cautious, and the other excites his hatred, and a desire to revenge himself.
  • Aristotle
    Aristotle
    Greek philosopher 384 BC - 322 BC
    Aristotle
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    I have gained this from philosophy: that I do without being commanded what others do only from fear of the law.
  • Henry David Thoreau
    Henry David Thoreau
    American writer 1817-1862
    Henry David Thoreau
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    I have lived some thirty-odd years on this planet, and I have yet to hear the first syllable of valuable or even earnest advice from my seniors.
  • Alfred N. Whitehead
    Alfred N. Whitehead
    English philosopher and mathematician 1861-1947
    Alfred N. Whitehead
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    I have suffered a great deal from writers who have quoted this or that sentence of mine either out of its context or in juxtaposition to some incongruous matter which quite distorted my meaning, or destroyed it altogether.
  • Joseph Addison
    Joseph Addison
    English politician, writer and poet 1672-1719
    Joseph Addison
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    If we may believe our logicians, man is distinguished from all other creatures by the faculty of laughter. He has a heart capable of mirth, and naturally disposed to it.
  • Samuel Taylor Coleridge
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge
    English poet and critic 1772-1834
    Samuel Taylor Coleridge
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    Intense study of the Bible will keep any writer from being vulgar, in point of style.
  • Ralph Waldo Emerson
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
    American poet and philosopher 1803-1882
    Ralph Waldo Emerson
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    It is hard to go beyond your public. If they are satisfied with cheap performance, you will not easily arrive at better. If they know what is good, and require it. you will aspire and burn until you achieve it. But from time to time, in history, men are born a whole age too soon.
  • Maurice Maeterlinck
    Maurice Maeterlinck
    Belgian playwright, poet and essayist 1862-1949
    Maurice Maeterlinck
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    It is not from reason that justice springs, but goodness is born of wisdom.
  • Sigmund Freud
    Sigmund Freud
    Austrian psychiatrist 1856-1939
    Sigmund Freud
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    Just as a cautious businessman avoids investing all his capital in one concern, so wisdom would probably admonish us also not to anticipate all our happiness from one quarter alone.
  • Buddha
    Buddha
    Spiritual leader, born as Siddhartha Gautama ca. 450 BC - ca. 370 BC
    Buddha
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    Just as treasures are uncovered from the earth, so virtue appears from good deeds, and wisdom appears from a pure and peaceful mind. To walk safely through the maze of human life, one needs the light of wisdom and the guidance of virtue.
  • Aldous Huxley
    Aldous Huxley
    English writer 1894-1963
    Aldous Huxley
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    Knowledge is an affair of symbols and is, all too often, a hindrance to wisdom, the uncovering of the self from moment to moment.
  • Abraham Lincoln
    Abraham Lincoln
    American statesman 1809-1865
    Abraham Lincoln
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    Let reverence for the laws be breathed by every American mother to the lisping babe that prattles on her lap. Let it be taught in schools, in seminaries, and in colleges. Let it be written in primers, spelling books, and in almanacs. Let it be preached from the pulpit, proclaimed in legislative halls, and enforced in the courts of justice. And, in short, let it become the political religion of the nation.