Quotes: from

Quotes 106 till 120 of 3918.

  • Billy Graham
    Billy Graham
    American Evangelist 1918-
    Billy Graham
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    'Suffering should not make us bitter people,' my mother once said, 'it should make us better comforters.' Young people need to hear this from those who have walked before them, because someday they'll be walking those same steps, but there may not be anyone following behind.
  • Voltaire
    Voltaire
    French writer and philosopher (ps. of Fran├žois Marie Arouet) 1694-1778
    Voltaire
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    'That is indisputable,' was the answer, 'but in this country it is a good thing to kill an admiral from time to time to encourage the others.'
  • Bobby Flay
    Bobby Flay
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    'The Food Network' was just starting in New York, and I was getting lots of attention from Mesa Grill. They had no money, so if you couldn't get there by subway, you couldn't be on. It wasn't like TV was something I really wanted to do - but I knew it would be great publicity for my restaurants.
  • William Shakespeare
    William Shakespeare
    English playwright and poet 1564-1616
    William Shakespeare
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    'Tis but an hour ago since it was nine, and after one hour more twill be eleven. And so from hour to hour we ripe and ripe, and then from hour to hour we rot and rot. and thereby hangs a tale.
  • Carroll Quigley
    Carroll Quigley
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    ...controls on behavior shift from the intermediate levels of human experience (social, emotional and religious) to the lower (military and political) or to the upper (ideological). They become the externalized controls of a mature society: weapons, bureaucracies, material rewards, or ideology.
    Source: Oscar Iden Lecture Series, Lecture 3: The State of Individuals (1976)
  • Carroll Quigley
    Carroll Quigley
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    ...the nineteenth century Age of Expansion... brought on an acceleration of the main focus of the activities of society... from the areas of internal controls to the areas of external controls....the increasing role of propaganda... helped create an impression of stability.
    Source: Oscar Iden Lecture Series, Lecture 3: The State of Individuals (1976)
  • Mahatma Gandhi
    Mahatma Gandhi
    Indian politician 1917-1985
    Mahatma Gandhi
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    A ''No'' uttered from deepest conviction is better and greater than a ''Yes'' merely uttered to please, or what is worse, to avoid trouble.
  • Mahatma Gandhi
    Mahatma Gandhi
    Indian politician 1917-1985
    Mahatma Gandhi
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    A 'No' uttered from the deepest conviction is better than a 'Yes' merely uttered to please, or worse, to avoid trouble.
  • Aldous Huxley
    Aldous Huxley
    English writer 1894-1963
    Aldous Huxley
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    A bad book is as much of a labor to write as a good one, it comes as sincerely from the author's soul.
  • Joe Dimaggio
    Joe Dimaggio
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    A ball player has got to be kept hungry be become a big leaguer. That is why no boy from a rich family ever made the big leagues.
  • Carl Sagan
    Carl Sagan
    American astronomer, cosmologist, astrophysicist and author 1934-1996
    Carl Sagan
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    A book is made from a tree. It is an assemblage of flat, flexible parts (still called "leaves") imprinted with dark pigmented squiggles. One glance at it and you hear the voice of another person, perhaps someone dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, the author is speaking, clearly and silently, inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people, citizens of distant epochs, who never knew one another. Books break th
  • Robert Benchley
    Robert Benchley
    American humorist, criticus 1889-1945
    Robert Benchley
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    A boy can learn a lot from a dog: obedience, loyalty, and the importance of turning around three times before lying down.
  • Carl Sagan
    Carl Sagan
    American astronomer, cosmologist, astrophysicist and author 1934-1996
    Carl Sagan
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    A central lesson of science is that to understand complex issues (or even simple ones), we must try to free our minds of dogma and to guarantee the freedom to publish, to contradict, and to experiment. Arguments from authority are unacceptable.
    Source: Billions and Billions: Thoughts of Life and Death at the Brink of the Millenium (1997) Ch. 14, The Common Enemy.
  • Anthony Holden
    Anthony Holden
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    A close associate of his gave an interview in which the book was described as quotes 'fiction from being to end'. I suffered trial by tabloid for a couple of weeks, lots of insults in the press, in the columns - this man should be put in the tower and so on.
  • C. Northcote Parkinson
    C. Northcote Parkinson
    British naval historian and author 1909-1993
    C. Northcote Parkinson
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    A committee is organic rather than mechanical in its nature: it is not a structure but a plant. It takes root and grows, it flowers, wilts, and dies, scattering the seed from which other committees will bloom in their turn.