Quotes: human

Quotes 31 till 45 of 1419.

  • Henry David Thoreau
    Henry David Thoreau
    American writer 1817-1862
    Henry David Thoreau
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    I have no doubt that it is a part of the destiny of the human race, in its gradual improvement, to leave off eating animals, as surely as the savage tribes have left off eating each other when they came in contact with the more civilized.
  • Mahatma Gandhi
    Mahatma Gandhi
    Indian politician 1917-1985
    Mahatma Gandhi
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    Indolence is a delightful but distressing state; we must be doing something to be happy. Action is no less necessary than thought to the instinctive tendencies of the human frame.
  • Henry Brooks Adams
    Henry Brooks Adams
    American historian 1838-1918
    Henry Brooks Adams
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    It is impossible to underrate human intelligence - beginning with one's own.
  • Samuel Johnson
    Samuel Johnson
    English writer 1709-1784
    Samuel Johnson
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    It is very strange, and very melancholy, that the paucity of human pleasures should persuade us ever to call hunting one of them.
  • Joseph Addison
    Joseph Addison
    English politician, writer and poet 1672-1719
    Joseph Addison
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    Mutability of temper and inconsistency with ourselves is the greatest weakness of human nature.
  • Eugène Ionesco
    Eugène Ionesco
    Romanian-born French Playwright 1912-
    Eugène Ionesco
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    No society has been able to abolish human sadness, no political system can deliver us from the pain of living, from our fear of death, our thirst for the absolute. It is the human condition that directs the social condition, not vice versa.
  • Harry S. Truman
    Harry S. Truman
    American president 1884-1972
    Harry S. Truman
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    The human animal cannot be trusted for anything good except en masse. The combined thought and action of the whole people of any race, creed or nationality, will always point in the right direction.
  • Salman Rushdie
    Salman Rushdie
    Engels writer 1948-
    Salman Rushdie
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    The liveliness of literature lies in its exceptionality, in being the individual, idiosyncratic vision of one human being, in which, to our delight and great surprise, we may find our own vision reflected.
  • Victor Hugo
    Victor Hugo
    French writer 1802-1885
    Victor Hugo
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    The mountains, the forest, and the sea, render men savage; they develop the fierce, but yet do not destroy the human.
  • Carolyn See
    Carolyn See
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    'A Long Way Gone' says something about human nature that we try, most of the time, to ignore.
  • Caroline Shaw
    Caroline Shaw
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    'Partita' is a simple piece. Born of a love of surface and structure, of the human voice, of dancing and tired ligaments, of music, and of our basic desire to draw a line from one point to another.
  • Carroll Quigley
    Carroll Quigley
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    ...controls on behavior shift from the intermediate levels of human experience (social, emotional and religious) to the lower (military and political) or to the upper (ideological). They become the externalized controls of a mature society: weapons, bureaucracies, material rewards, or ideology.
    Source: Oscar Iden Lecture Series, Lecture 3: The State of Individuals (1976)
  • Carroll Quigley
    Carroll Quigley
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    ...the levels of culture, the aspects of society: military, political, economic, social, emotional, religious, and intellectual. Those are your basic human needs....they are arranged in evolutionary sequence.
    Source: Oscar Iden Lecture Series, Lecture 3: The State of Individuals (1976)
  • Carl Sagan
    Carl Sagan
    American astronomer, cosmologist, astrophysicist and author 1934-1996
    Carl Sagan
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    A book is made from a tree. It is an assemblage of flat, flexible parts (still called "leaves") imprinted with dark pigmented squiggles. One glance at it and you hear the voice of another person, perhaps someone dead for thousands of years. Across the millennia, the author is speaking, clearly and silently, inside your head, directly to you. Writing is perhaps the greatest of human inventions, binding together people, citizens of distant epochs, who never knew one another. Books break th
  • Paul J. Meyer
    Paul J. Meyer
    American businessman and business consultant 1928-
    Paul J. Meyer
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    A burning desire is the greatest motivator of every human action. The desire for success implants ''success consciousness'' which, in turn, creates a vigorous and ever-increasing ''habit of success.''