Abigail Adams

Wife of John Adams

Lived from: 1744-1818

Quotes: Abigail Adams

Quotes 1 till 15 of 22.

1 2 Next 
  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    A little of what you call frippery is very necessary towards looking like the rest of the world.

    Source: Letter to John Adams (1 May 1780)

  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    Arbitrary power is like most other things which are very hard, very liable to be broken.
  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    Deliver me from your cold phlegmatic preachers, politicians, friends, lovers and husbands.

    Source: Letter to John Adams (5 August 1776)

  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    Great necessities call out great virtues.
  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    I am more and more convinced that man is a dangerous creature and that power, whether vested in many or a few, is ever grasping, and like the grave, cries, 'Give, give.
  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    I begin to think, that a calm is not desirable in any situation in life....Man was made for action and for bustle too, I believe.
  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    I regret the narrow contracted education of the females of my own country.

    Source: Letter to John Adams (30 June 1778)

  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    I wish most sincerely there was not a slave in this province. It always appeared a most iniquitous scheme to me - to fight ourselves for what we are daily robbing and plundering from those who have as good a right to freedom as we have.

    Source: Letter to John Adams (24 September 1774)

  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    I've always felt that a person's intelligence is directly reflected by the number of conflicting points of view he can entertain simultaneously on the same topic.
  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    If particular care and attention is not paid to the ladies, we are determined to foment a rebellion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any laws in which we have no voice, or representation.
  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    If we mean to have heroes, statesmen and philosophers, we should have learned women.
  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    In the new Code of Laws which I suppose it will be necessary for you to make I desire you would Remember the Ladies, and be more generous and favorable to them than your ancestors. Do not put such unlimited power into the hands of the Husbands. Remember all Men would be tyrants if they could. If perticular care and attention is not paid to the Ladies we are determined to foment a Rebelion, and will not hold ourselves bound by any Laws in which we have no voice, or Representation.

    Source: Letter to John Adams, 31 March 1776

  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    It is really mortifying, sir, when a woman possessed of a common share of understanding considers the difference of education between the male and female sex, even in those families where education is attended to.... Nay why should your sex wish for such a disparity in those whom they one day intend for companions and associates. Pardon me, sir, if I cannot help sometimes suspecting that this neglect arises in some measure from an ungenerous jealousy of rivals near the throne.

    Source: Letter to John Thaxter, 15 February 1778

  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    Learning is not attained by chance, it must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.
  • Abigail Adams
    Abigail Adams
    - +
     0
    Learning is not attained by chance. It must be sought for with ardor and attended to with diligence.
1 2 Next 

About Abigail Adams

Abigail Adams (née Smith; November 22,  1744 – October 28, 1818) was the closest advisor and wife of John Adams, as well as the mother of John Quincy Adams. She is sometimes considered to have been a Founder of the United States, and is now designated as the first Second Lady and second First Lady of the United States, although these titles were not in use at the time.

From Wikipedia