Rose Macaulay

Rose Macaulay

English writer

Lived from: 1881-1958

Category: Writers (Contemporary)

Quotes: Rose Macaulay

Quotes 1 till 9 of 9.

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  • Rose Macaulay
    Rose Macaulay
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    : One should, I think, always give children money, for they will spend it for themselves far more profitably than we can ever spend it for them.
  • Rose Macaulay
    Rose Macaulay
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    A hot bath! I cry, as I sit down in it! Again as I lie flat, a hot bath! How exquisite a pleasure, how luxurious, fervid and flagrant a consolation for the rigors, the austerities, the renunciation of the day.
  • Rose Macaulay
    Rose Macaulay
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    At the worst, a house unkept cannot be so distressing as a life unlived.
  • Rose Macaulay
    Rose Macaulay
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    Cranks live by theory, not by pure desire. They want votes, peace, nuts, liberty, and spinning-looms not because they love these things, as a child loves jam, but because they think they ought to have them. That is one element which makes the crank.
  • Rose Macaulay
    Rose Macaulay
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    Giving is not at all interesting; but receiving is, there is no doubt about it, delightful.
  • Dame Rose Macaulay
    Dame Rose Macaulay
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    It was a book to kill time for those who like it better dead.
  • Rose Macaulay
    Rose Macaulay
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    Life is a great and noble game between the citizen and the government.
  • Rose Macaulay
    Rose Macaulay
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    Sleeping in a bed - it is, apparently, of immense importance. Against those who sleep, from choice or necessity, elsewhere society feels righteously hostile. It is not done. It is disorderly, anarchical.
  • Rose Macaulay
    Rose Macaulay
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    You should always believe all you read in newspapers, as this makes them more interesting.
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About Rose Macaulay

Dame Emilie Rose Macaulay, DBE (1 August 1881 – 30 October 1958) was an English writer, most noted for her award-winning novel The Towers of Trebizond, about a small Anglo-Catholic group crossing Turkey by camel. The story is seen as a spiritual autobiography, reflecting her own changing and conflicting beliefs. Macaulay’s novels were partly-influenced by Virginia Woolf; she also wrote biographies and travelogues.

From Wikipedia