Seneca

Seneca

Roman philosopher, statesman and playwright

Lived from: 5 BC - 65 A.D.

Category: Politics | Philosophers | Writers (Contemporary)

Quotes: Seneca

Quotes 106 till 120 of 182.

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    Philosophy does not regard pedigree, she received Plato not as a noble, but she made him one.
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    Precepts or maxims are of great weight; and a few useful ones on hand do more to produce a happy life than the volumes we can't find.
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    Remember that pain has this most excellent quality. If prolonged it cannot be severe, and if severe it cannot be prolonged.
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    Remove severe restraint and what will become of virtue?
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    See how many are better off than you are, but consider how many are worse.
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    Shame may restrain what law does not prohibit.
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    Shun no toil to make yourself remarkable by some talent or other; yet do not devote yourself to one branch exclusively. Strive to get clear notions about all. Give up no science entirely; for science is but one.
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    Slavery takes hold of few, but many take hold of slavery.
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    So enjoy present pleasures as to not mar those to come.
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    So live with men as if God saw you and speak to God, as if men heard you.
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    Sovereignty over any foreign land is insecure.
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    Success consecrates the most offensive crimes.
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    Success is not greedy, as people think, but insignificant. That is why it satisfies nobody.
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    That is never too often repeated, which is never sufficiently learned.
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    That moderation which nature prescribes, which limits our desires by resources restricted to our needs, has abandoned the field; it has now come to this - that to want only what is enough is a sign both of boorishness and of utter destitution.